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233 N Santa Cruz Ave
Los Gatos, CA 95030

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Welcome to our Website!

We invite you to take a look around our new site to get to know our practice and learn about eye and vision health. You will find a wealth of information about our optometrists, our staff and our services, as well as facts and advice about how to take care of your eyes and protect your vision.

Learn about our Practice specialties including comprehensive eye exams, contact lens fittings and the treatment of eye diseases. Our website also offers you a convenient way to find our hours, address and map, schedule an appointment online, order contact lenses or contact us to ask us any questions you have about eye care and our Practice.

Have a look around our online office and schedule a visit to meet us in person. We are here to partner with you and your family for a lifetime of healthy eyes and vision. We look forward to seeing you!

Online Patient History Forms

Click on the “Patient History Form ” tab on our web site and complete the form. The form is secure and our office will be notified once the form is complete. When you walk in for your next appointment, we’ll already have the information entered into our computers. We’re always looking for ways to serve our patients better.

Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Conjunctivitis, also called pink eye, is one of the most frequently seen eye diseases, especially in kids. It can be caused by viruses, bacteria or even allergies to pollen, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics, or other irritants, which touch the eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis might be quite transmittable and quickly spread in school and at the office.

Conjunctivitis is seen when the conjunctiva, or thin transparent layer of tissue covering the white part of the eye, becomes inflamed. You can identify conjunctivitis if you notice eye redness, discharge, itching or swollen eyelids and a crusty discharge surrounding the eyes early in the day. Pink eye infections can be divided into three main types: viral, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis.

The viral type is usually a result of a similar virus to that which produces the recognizable red, watery eyes, sore throat and runny nose of the common cold. The red, itchy, watery eyes caused by viral pink eye are likely to last from a week to two and then will clear up on their own. You may however, be able to reduce some of the discomfort by using soothing drops or compresses. Viral pink eye is transmittable until it is completely cleared up, so in the meantime maintain excellent hygiene, remove eye discharge and try to avoid using communal pillowcases or towels. If your son or daughter has viral conjunctivitis, he or she will have to be kept home from school for three days to a week until symptoms disappear.

A bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or cream. One should notice an improvement within just a few days of antibiotic drops, but be sure to adhere to the full prescription dosage to prevent pink eye from recurring.

Allergic pink eye is not contagious. It is usually a result of a known allergy such as hay fever or pet allergies that sets off an allergic reaction in their eyes. First of all, to treat allergic pink eye, you should eliminate the irritant. Use cool compresses and artificial tears to relieve discomfort in mild cases. When the infection is more severe, your eye doctor might prescribe a medication such as an anti-inflammatory or antihistamine. In cases of chronic allergic pink eye, topical steroid eye drops could be used.

Pink eye should always be diagnosed by a qualified eye doctor in order to identify the type and best course of treatment. Never treat yourself! Keep in mind the sooner you begin treatment, the lower chance you have of giving pink eye to loved ones or prolonging your discomfort.

 

7 Facts You Should Know About Glaucoma

glaucoma diagram

Glaucoma, which refers to a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve, is often called ‘the silent thief of sight’. This nickname evolved because the disease creeps up unnoticed in its early stages, causing no pain and few, if any symptoms. However, if left untreated it is progressive and irreversible and ultimately leads to blindness, usually affecting peripheral vision first.

Here are 7 important facts you should know about glaucoma:

  1. According to the National Eye Institute of the National Institute of Health, more than 4 million people in the United States have glaucoma.
  2. Glaucoma causes damage to the optic nerve (the nerve that connects the eyes and the brain) usually as a result of increased pressure in the eye.
  3. Early stages of the disease diminish peripheral vision. If the disease is not controlled, glaucoma often eventually causes total blindness.
  4. The best way to detect glaucoma is through a dilated eye exam. The eye doctor views the optic nerve for signs of glaucoma. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is also measured, although this measurement is not enough to determine glaucoma, as it can fluctuate even throughout the day, and it is possible to have glaucoma even if IOP falls within the normal range, or to have high pressure without glaucoma. If the disease is suspected, further testing will be done, which may include visual field tests and digital retinal scanning.
  5. Anyone can get glaucoma but you are at increased risk for developing glaucoma if you have the following risk factors:
    • over 40
    • diabetes
    • high blood pressure
    • African American or Hispanic descent
    • family history of the disease
  6. Glaucoma can be controlled through a variety of approaches designed to lower and control pressure build up in your eye.
    • Treatment can involve the use of medicated eye drops.
    • Laser procedures and minor surgical procedures can be used depending on the type and stage of glaucoma.
  7. The best way to prevent vision loss from glaucoma is through early diagnosis so make sure to schedule a complete eye exam with your eye care professional at least once a year.

Don’t be the next victim of the silent thief of sight. Speak to your eye doctor about your risk of glaucoma today.

9 Tips for Coping With Eye Allergy Season

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Spring is on the way. Soon the sun will be shining, the flowers blooming and allergy season will be upon us. If you have allergies, your eyes are often affected by the high pollen count along with other allergens floating in the fresh spring air. Tree pollens in April and May, grass pollens in June and July and mold spores and weed pollens in July and August add up to five months of eye-irritating allergens, leading to red, itchy, watery eyes, headache and sometimes fatigue.

Here are some practical tips on how to keep your eyes happy as the seasons change.

These are only a few steps you can take to make your eyes more comfortable. Remember to seek medical help from your eye care professional if symptoms persist or worsen. Sometimes allergy medication or an antihistamine may be necessary for relief.

  1. Avoid rubbing your eyes as this intensifies the symptoms.
  2. One of the prime seasonal allergens that most disturbs eyes is pollen. Stay indoors when pollen counts are high, especially in the mid-morning and early evening.
  3. Wear sunglasses outside to protect your eyes, not only from UV rays, but also from allergens floating in the air.
  4. Check and clean your air conditioning filters.
  5. Use a humidifier or set out bowls of fresh water inside when using your air conditioning to help humidify the air and ensure that your eyes don’t dry out.
  6. Take a shower or bath to help maintain skin and eye moisture and improve your resistance to allergens.
  7. Allergy proof your home:
    • use dust-mite-proof covers on bedding and pillows
    • clean surfaces with a damp implement rather than dusting or dry sweeping
    • remove/ kill any mold in your home
    • keep pets outdoors if you have pet allergies.
  8. Remove contact lenses as soon as any symptoms appear.
  9. Use artificial tears to keep eyes moist.

 

Here’s a list of the most challenging places to live with eye allergies in the US: http://www.aafa.org/pdfs/FINAL_public_LIST_Spring_2014.pdf

Keeping an Eye on Cataracts

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Cataracts affect millions of people nationwide and as the population continues to age, the numbers keep increasing. The good news is, cataracts are often manageable and treatable.

As June is Cataract Awareness Month, here are some facts you should know to help you recognize cataracts and prevent permanent vision loss.

    1. A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye, which inhibits the passage of light into the eye and results in blurred or dimmed vision. The lens is what helps to focus an image onto the retina, which transmits the images to the brain.

 

    1. Cataracts usually develop as a natural result of the aging process and can occur in one or both eyes.

 

    1. Aside from aging, other risk factors for developing cataracts include: long-term exposure to UV rays from the sun, certain health conditions (e.g. diabetes), genetic predisposition, eye injuries, eye inflammation, long-term steroid use and other medications, and smoking.

 

    1. Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss among adults 55 and older. Over half the population above the age 65 has some degree of cataract development.

 

    1. By the age of 80, it is likely that most people will have developed a cataract or had surgery to remove it.

 

    1. During the early stages of cataract development, you can use stronger lighting and glasses. Special lens coatings can also reduce glare. At a certain point, however, cataract surgery is required to improve your vision.

 

    1. Cataract surgery is very common and involves the removal of the clouded lens and in most cases replaces it with a clear lens made from plastic, called an intraocular lens (IOL). New developments in IOLs are constantly being researched to make the surgery even less complicated and more successful in helping to restore vision in patients.

 

    1. Over 90 percent of people who have cataract surgery regain useful vision. Consult with your eye doctor to get information about the pros and cons, alternatives and expected results of cataract surgery.

 

    1. The key to preventing permanent vision loss is regular eye exams. If you are 65 or over, you should have a yearly eye exam, even if you feel your vision is unchanged.

 

While cataracts are a natural part of aging, it is vital to ensure that you care for your eyes your entire life. Again, make sure that you have a dilated exam at least once a year. This will ensure you are examined for cataract development and for other eye and vision problems and will also help to maintain your overall eye health.

Should You Be Worried About Eye Floaters?

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Eye floaters are actually more common that you may think. Many people notice specks or cobweb-like images moving around in their line of vision, at some point. Some even report experiencing a “snow globe effect” as if they are swatting at many imaginary bugs. Floaters may be an annoyance, but in most cases, they are harmless and merely a part of aging. Here are some answers to questions you may have about eye floaters including warning signs that something may be seriously wrong and requires immediate treatment by an eye care professional.

What are eye floaters?

Eye floaters are collagen deposits inside the vitreous humor that fills the space between the lens and retina of your eye. As you age, the vitreous, which is made up of this gel-like protein substance, begins to dissolve and liquefy, creating a more watery consistency. Floaters appear when the collagen fibrils and vitreous membrane become disturbed and go into your line of sight. A posterior vitreous detachment is a common age related change that causes a sudden large floater to occur. Floaters can range in size, shape and consistency and are often more visible when looking at a white screen or clear blue sky.

What is the vitreous?

The vitreous functions to maintain the round shape of your eyeball. It assists with light refraction and acts as a shock absorber for the retina.

How do floaters develop?

As mentioned above, aging of the vitreous can cause it to liquefy, shrink and become stringy or strand-like. As the vitreous is normally transparent, when strands develop they cast a shadow on your retina, which in turn causes floaters to appear in your vision.

What will I see if I have floaters?

Eye floaters can appear in your vision as threads, fragments of cobwebs or spots which float slowly in front of your eyes. You’ll also notice that these specks never seem to stay still when you try to focus on them. Floaters and spots create the impression that they are drifting and they seem to move when your eye moves.

Who is at risk for developing floaters?

Floaters are quite common particularly in individuals that are elderly, diabetic, near-sighted or anyone who has had cataract surgery.

Are floaters dangerous and do they need treatment?

In many cases, floaters are simply an annoyance and can be left alone. Sometimes they will improve over time. In some cases though, floaters can be so distracting that they can block vision and consequently interfere with daily activities and functioning. If you experience a sudden onset of floaters, if they are accompanied by flashes of light or vision loss, if you have pain or you have just experienced eye surgery or trauma, floaters could indicate a serious eye problem that requires immediate medical attention. There are a number of eye disorders associated with eye floaters including retinal detachment, retinal tear, vitreous bleeding, vitreous and retinal inflammation or eye tumors, all of which require medical treatment to avoid vision loss. If you have sudden onset of new floaters, do not wait to book an appointment with your eye doctor to confirm if the floaters are benign or need immediate surgical treatment.

6 Things You Should Know about UV Radiation and Your Eyes

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The heat of long summer days is nearly upon us. As the sun's rays intensify and people spend more time outdoors in the sunshine it is very important to be aware of the potential damage exposure to the sun can have on your eyes. May is UV Awareness month. Here are 6 things you should know about ultraviolet rays and how important it is to protect your eyes from the sun year round.

  1. Exposing your eyes to UV rays can harm your vision and cause a number of eye issues such as cataracts, corneal sunburn, macular degeneration, pterygium and skin cancer around the eyelids.
  2. Everyone, including children, is at risk for eye damage from UV radiation. Those who work or play in the sun, or are exposed to the sun for extended amounts of time are at the highest risk for damage to their eyes or vision from UV rays. At 20 years of age, the average person has received 80% of their life’s UV exposure. Children have more transparent lenses in their eyes and more sensitive skin on their bodies. As a result, they are at great risk of experiencing adverse effects of over-exposure to UV light. The effects of overexposure to UV light at a younger age may not show up until later in life with higher risk of cataracts and age related macular degeneration. This is why it is critical to effectively protect our eyes from the sun.
  3. UV rays come from the sun but also reflect off other surfaces such as water, snow, sand and the ground. They are generally at their highest and most dangerous levels during peak sun hours, usually between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
  4. There are 2 types of UV rays that can harm your sight:

    • UV-A rays can cause damage to your central vision.
    • UV-B rays can damage the cornea and lens on the front of your eye.
  5. The best way to protect your eyes from the sun is by wearing sunglasses or eyewear that absorbs UV rays, together with a wide brimmed hat.
  6. UV protection is the most important factor when purchasing sunglasses. Here's what you should look for:

    • Eyewear that filters 100% UV-A and UV-B rays, providing you with maximum protection.
    • Eyewear that reduces glare and does not distort color.
    • Important to know: UV protection is available in some clear lenses as well as sunglasses. The choice can be confusing if you do not have some background information. Not all lenses are equal in terms of UV protection. For example, cheaply made UV400 sunglasses have a spray-on coating that will wear off with cleaning and give you a false sense of security. 

 

Don't take any shortcuts when it comes to protecting your eyes from the sun. Stay indoors during peak sun hours and if you have to go out, be sure that your eyewear blocks UV rays so that you can protect your eyes and your vision.  

Protecting Your Eyes From The Desk Job

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There are so many people who spend hours a day, if not most of the day working on a computer or mobile device. They usually do so without taking notice of the effect this has on their bodies. Using a computer or handheld device for extended amounts of time can cause physical stress to your body due to improper positioning such as slouching, sitting without foot support, extending your wrists and straining your eyes.

Individuals  who look at a computer or mobile screen for prolonged periods can develop computer vision syndrome (CVS) which places an enormous amount of stress on your visual system and can induce headaches and fatigue, neck, back and shoulder pain, and dry eyes among other symptoms.

Here are some tips for creating a workstation that reduces your risk of eye strain, discomfort and the potential injury that can result from prolonged computer use.

1.     Take breaks

Your eyes are at work all the time so sometimes it is good to give them a break. Since the eyes use more than one muscle group, you can do this by shifting your focus from near to far on a regular basis. How often? Apply the 20/20/20 rule – take a 20 second break every 20 minutes to focus your eyes on an object 20 feet away. This can prevent eyestrain and help your eyes refocus.

You can also roll your eyes: first clockwise then counterclockwise briefly.

2.     Position your Monitor

Ensure that your screen is placed so that the top of the display is at or slightly below eye level. This will allow you to view the screen without bending your neck. If you aren’t able to adjust the screen height, you can adjust the height of your chair to achieve this positioning, but if this causes your feet to dangle, it is advisable to use a footrest.  

3.     Reduce Glare on the Screen

Glare is the main cause of eye strain.  Use blinds and curtains on windows to control the amount of light entering the room. If glare is caused from overhead lights, use a dimmer or replace light bulbs with lower wattage bulbs. Sometimes you don’t have control over the lighting, like if you work in an office.  Consider purchasing an anti -glare screen to put on the monitor to help filter reflected light.

4.     Blink Frequently

Make a conscious effort to blink frequently to prevent the surface of your eye from drying out. Dry eyes can be a problem with extensive screen viewing because your blink rate decreases when looking at a screen. This is particularly important if you wear contact lenses. If you find that blinking is not reducing your feelings of dry eyes, try over the counter artificial tears. Consult your optometrist about dry eye and artificial tears, because some eye drops may work better for you than others.

5.     Rest your eyes from strong lights

Some holistic practitioners recommend “palming” to rejuvenate: without touching your eyes, cup your hand lightly over your eyes for 30 seconds to rest them from light.

Either way, simply closing your eyes for a longer period than a blink can be comforting once in a while.

6.     Make sure your glasses fit the screen

If you wear reading glasses, bifocals or multifocals, you should be able to look at your monitor without tilting your head back. If not, adjust so that you can see comfortably.

7.     Consider Computer Glasses

Computer glasses are specifically designed for prolonged computer usage. The lens power aims to relax the amount of accommodation you need to keep objects in focus at the distance of the computer monitor and provides the largest field of view. Speak to your eye doctor to explore this option.

Some optometrists recommend certain lens coatings for computer use, for example blue blocker lens coatings that protect the eyes from high energy visible light (HEV).

8.     Move!

Sitting at the computer for too long is not only harmful to your eyes. It can cause stiffness and pain in the rest of your body, too.  Avoid this by getting up and moving around on a regular basis.

  • Every 10 minutes, take a short 10-20 second break by getting out of your computer chair and moving around.
  • Every 30-60 minutes, take a 2-5 minute break to stretch your arms, back and neck and walk around.

Here are some more tips on how to design an ergonomic workstation

http://www.uhs.umich.edu/files/uhs/ergo.pdf